Let's build the future of Santa Monica together.

Oblique aerial image of the Santa Monica Airport site within the Santa Monica neighborhood context, with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
Oblique aerial image of the Santa Monica Airport site within the Santa Monica neighborhood context, with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
Oblique aerial image of the Santa Monica Airport site within the Santa Monica neighborhood context, with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
Oblique aerial image of the Santa Monica Airport site within the Santa Monica neighborhood context, with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
Graphic featuring a green ground plane and tree with a swooping motif of an airplane changing into a bird in light blue.
Graphic featuring a green ground plane and tree with a swooping motif of an airplane changing into a bird in light blue.
Graphic featuring a green ground plane and tree with a swooping motif of an airplane changing into a bird in light blue.

Let's shape the future of Santa Monica Airport site together.

This website will keep you updated on what is happening with the planning process, and how you can get involved. Check back periodically for updates.

EN

PROCESS

About the Project

About the Project

About the Project

Welcome to the Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project (SMACP) community engagement website.


The Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project is a once-in-a-lifetime planning effort for Santa Monica to create a preferred scenario centered on a great park, consistent with Measure LC. The future scenario will enhance connections to the rest of the city, create a quality public realm and increase the quality of life for residents, workers, and visitors of Santa Monica. The public process for this project is consistent with past City Council direction to establish a plan for future use of the land, and to address the community’s interest in the creation of parks, recreation, cultural, and educational amenities and to address community goals and priorities as they relate to current and future generations. To understand the legal frameworks and history, please visit the City of Santa Monica's Project Website.


Learn more about the plan and share your thoughts and ideas below!

PROCESS

Project Schedule

Project Schedule

There are five distinct planning phases within a 21-month process (with Phase 3 containing two sub-phases—3A and 3B). Click on the phases below to learn more about the intent and components of each phase. Products resulting from each phase, including key takeaways from analysis and assessments, project material, and takeaways from community input will be added to this site as the project advances.


Each phase of work includes distinct tasks in the process of generating a preferred scenario for the future of the Santa Monica Airport site. Throughout each phase of work, the project team will engage with the community through a variety of in-person and online events and activities. Ahead of moving on to each next phase of work, the planning team will meet with the Santa Monica City Council to report progress, findings, and community input collected and receive direction.

Phase 1 Charting the Course

Spring-Summer 2024

Current Phase

Phase 2 Discovering the Place & Setting the Stage

Summer-Winter 2024

Phase 3B

Summer 2025

Phase 3A Defining the Future of Place: 3 Scenarios

Winter-Spring 2025

Phase 3B

Summer 2025

Phase 3B: Defining the Future of Place: Preferred Scenario

Summer 2025

Phase 3A

Winter-Spring 2025

Phase 4 The Path Ahead

Summer-Fall 2025

Phase 5 Preferred Scenario Plan

Summer-Winter 2025

Phase 1 Charting the Course

March–July 2024

Current Phase

Phase 2 Discovering the Place

Summer 2024

Phase 3A Defining the Future of Place: 3 Scenarios

Winter-Spring 2025

Phase 3B: Defining the Future of Place: Preferred Scenario

Summer 2025

Phase 4 The Path Ahead

Summer-Fall 2025

Phase 5 Preferred Scenario Plan

Summer-Winter 2025

Phase 1 Charting the Course

Spring-Summer 2024

Current Phase

Phase 2 Discovering the Place & Setting the Stage

Summer-Winter 2024

Phase 3A Defining the Future of Place: 3 Scenarios

Winter-Spring 2025

Phase 3B: Defining the Future of Place: Preferred Scenario

Summer 2025

Phase 4 The Path Ahead

Summer-Fall 2025

Phase 5 Preferred Scenario Plan

Summer-Winter 2025

Phase 1 Charting the Course

Spring-Summer 2024

Current Phase

Phase 2 Discovering the Place & Setting the Stage

Summer-Winter 2024

Phase 3B

Summer 2025

Phase 3A Defining the Future of Place: 3 Scenarios

Winter-Spring 2025

Phase 3B

Summer 2025

Phase 3B: Defining the Future of Place: Preferred Scenario

Summer 2025

Phase 3A

Winter-Spring 2025

Phase 4 The Path Ahead

Summer-Fall 2025

Phase 5 Preferred Scenario Plan

Summer-Winter 2025

HISTORY

Site History Timeline

Site History Timeline

Over 10,000 Years Ago

The Santa Monica Airport site is on land of the Yaavitam, the first people of this ancestral and unceded territory of Kuruvungna that we now know as Santa Monica.

1910s

Originally a barley field, the Santa Monica Airdrome served as a base for US Army Air Service reserve during WWI.

1920s

The City held a special municipal election to approve a park bond to purchase the site in 1926. In 1929, the Airport hosted the first-ever Women’s National Air Derby.

1930s

The Airport leased and operated by the federal government during WWII and the Douglas Aircraft Company produced almost 30,000 aircrafts at the SMO facility and its workforce swells to 160,000.

1940s

During WWII, a decoy “neighborhood” was constructed to conceal the entire Airport site when viewed from the air.

1950s

Barker Hangar is built as an aviation manufacturing site.

1980s

Clover Park expands onto airport land with a 5.4 acre parcel which included two softball fields, a playground, and a restroom building.

2014

Measure LC is put on the ballot and approved by Santa Monica voters. Measure LC prohibits new development on Airport land, except for parks, public open spaces and public recreational facilities, until the voters approve limits on the uses and development that may occur on the land and affirms the City Council’s authority to manage the Airport and to close all or part of it after December 31, 2028.

2017

The Santa Monica City Council adopted Resolution 11026 directing the City to take all actions necessary to ensure the closure of the Santa Monica Airport (Airport) effective as of midnight on December 31, 2028 per the terms of the Consent Decree with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

2017 Continued

Santa Monica Airport’s runway is shortened from 5,000-feet to 3,500-feet, less than a year after the consent decree was signed. The City removed the excess pavement in 2018. The shortened runway significantly reduced impacts from jet aircraft operation to the neighboring communities by 81%. Jet operations continue to remain at low levels.

2024

Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project kicks-off, beginning a nearly two-year process of engagement with the Santa Monica community to shape a preferred scenario, centered on a great park, for the future of the Santa Monica Airport site.

Want to learn more?

Click the link for a complete site history of the Santa Monica Airport!

Over 10,000 Years Ago

The Santa Monica Airport site is on land of the Yaavitam, the first people of this ancestral and unceded territory of Kuruvungna that we now know as Santa Monica.

1910s

Originally a barley field, the Santa Monica Airdrome served as a base for US Army Air Service reserve during WWI.

1920s

The City held a special municipal election to approve a park bond to purchase the site in 1926. In 1929, the Airport hosted the first-ever Women’s National Air Derby.

1930s

The Airport leased and operated by the federal government during WWII and the Douglas Aircraft Company produced almost 30,000 aircrafts at the SMO facility and its workforce swells to 160,000.

1940s

During WWII, a decoy “neighborhood” was constructed to conceal the entire Airport site when viewed from the air.

1950s

Barker Hangar is built as an aviation manufacturing site.

1980s

Clover Park expands onto airport land with a 5.4 acre parcel which included two softball fields, a playground, and a restroom building.

2014

Measure LC is put on the ballot and approved by Santa Monica voters. Measure LC prohibits new development on Airport land, except for parks, public open spaces and public recreational facilities, until the voters approve limits on the uses and development that may occur on the land and affirms the City Council’s authority to manage the Airport and to close all or part of it after December 31, 2028.

2017

The Santa Monica City Council adopted Resolution 11026 directing the City to take all actions necessary to ensure the closure of the Santa Monica Airport (Airport) effective as of midnight on December 31, 2028 per the terms of the Consent Decree with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

2017 Continued

Santa Monica Airport’s runway is shortened from 5,000-feet to 3,500-feet, less than a year after the consent decree was signed. The City removed the excess pavement in 2018. The shortened runway significantly reduced impacts from jet aircraft operation to the neighboring communities by 81%. Jet operations continue to remain at low levels.

2024

Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project kicks-off, beginning a nearly two-year process of engagement with the Santa Monica community to shape a preferred scenario, centered on a great park, for the future of the Santa Monica Airport site.

Want to learn more?

Click the link for a complete site history of the Santa Monica Airport!

Over 10,000 Years Ago

The Santa Monica Airport site is on land of the Yaavitam, the first people of this ancestral and unceded territory of Kuruvungna that we now know as Santa Monica.

1910s

Originally a barley field, the Santa Monica Airdrome served as a base for US Army Air Service reserve during WWI.

1920s

The City held a special municipal election to approve a park bond to purchase the site in 1926. In 1929, the Airport hosted the first-ever Women’s National Air Derby.

1930s

The Airport leased and operated by the federal government during WWII and the Douglas Aircraft Company produced almost 30,000 aircrafts at the SMO facility and its workforce swells to 160,000.

1940s

During WWII, a decoy “neighborhood” was constructed to conceal the entire Airport site when viewed from the air.

1950s

Barker Hangar is built as an aviation manufacturing site.

1980s

Clover Park expands onto airport land with a 5.4 acre parcel which included two softball fields, a playground, and a restroom building.

2014

Measure LC is put on the ballot and approved by Santa Monica voters. Measure LC prohibits new development on Airport land, except for parks, public open spaces and public recreational facilities, until the voters approve limits on the uses and development that may occur on the land and affirms the City Council’s authority to manage the Airport and to close all or part of it after December 31, 2028.

2017

The Santa Monica City Council adopted Resolution 11026 directing the City to take all actions necessary to ensure the closure of the Santa Monica Airport (Airport) effective as of midnight on December 31, 2028 per the terms of the Consent Decree with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

2017 Continued

Santa Monica Airport’s runway is shortened from 5,000-feet to 3,500-feet, less than a year after the consent decree was signed. The City removed the excess pavement in 2018. The shortened runway significantly reduced impacts from jet aircraft operation to the neighboring communities by 81%. Jet operations continue to remain at low levels.

2024

Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project kicks-off, beginning a nearly two-year process of engagement with the Santa Monica community to shape a preferred scenario, centered on a great park, for the future of the Santa Monica Airport site.

Want to learn more?

Click the link for a complete site history of the Santa Monica Airport!

Historic map featuring archaeological sites belonging to the Gabrielino Indians near the end of the 1760s.
A painting showing members of the Tongva tribe and a few small structures on the grassy banks of a small stream.
A historical aerial image in black and white showing the agricultural uses that once comprised the Santa Monica Airport site.
An image of a historical newspaper clipping showing a black and white aerial image of the early Clover Field, with a small text blurb describing the site.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
A black and white photograph of two pilots standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field in the 1920s.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
An image of a promotional poster from the 1930s featuring an announcement of the Douglas Company's plan to build a a manufacturing campus at Clover Field. The poster features a rendering of the proposed facility at Clover Field, an image of over one hundred Douglas Company employees, and decorative patriotic and aviation elements.
A historical black and white photograph of a crowd of well-dressed people standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photo shows the runway having emerged on Clover Field as part of the Douglas Company's expansion of the site in the 1940s.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph showing Douglas Company facilities and hangars and several jet airplanes parked in lines on the taxiways outside.
A historical black and white photograph showcasing the decoy neighborhood that was constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An image from inside the decoy neighborhood constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph taken from an aircraft above the Clover Field runway shows the runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
A black and white photograph shows a small aircraft on the runway of Clover Field with an air traffic control tower in the background.
A black and white photograph of The Spirit of Santa Monica, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft, inside a hangar at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photograph of a built-out airport site, including the 5,000-foot runway and the extension of Clover Park onto airport land.
A photo from the 1980s showing kids playing on playground equipment at Clover Park.
An image of the text of Measure LC
An image of the text of Santa Monica City Council Resolution 11026
An image of a santamonica.gov release announcing the completed runway shortening
Blue and green image of project logo with the text "Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project" on it
Historic map featuring archaeological sites belonging to the Gabrielino Indians near the end of the 1760s.
A painting showing members of the Tongva tribe and a few small structures on the grassy banks of a small stream.
A historical aerial image in black and white showing the agricultural uses that once comprised the Santa Monica Airport site.
An image of a historical newspaper clipping showing a black and white aerial image of the early Clover Field, with a small text blurb describing the site.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
A black and white photograph of two pilots standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field in the 1920s.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
An image of a promotional poster from the 1930s featuring an announcement of the Douglas Company's plan to build a a manufacturing campus at Clover Field. The poster features a rendering of the proposed facility at Clover Field, an image of over one hundred Douglas Company employees, and decorative patriotic and aviation elements.
A historical black and white photograph of a crowd of well-dressed people standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photo shows the runway having emerged on Clover Field as part of the Douglas Company's expansion of the site in the 1940s.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph showing Douglas Company facilities and hangars and several jet airplanes parked in lines on the taxiways outside.
A historical black and white photograph showcasing the decoy neighborhood that was constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An image from inside the decoy neighborhood constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph taken from an aircraft above the Clover Field runway shows the runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
A black and white photograph shows a small aircraft on the runway of Clover Field with an air traffic control tower in the background.
A black and white photograph of The Spirit of Santa Monica, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft, inside a hangar at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photograph of a built-out airport site, including the 5,000-foot runway and the extension of Clover Park onto airport land.
A photo from the 1980s showing kids playing on playground equipment at Clover Park.
An image of the text of Measure LC
An image of the text of Santa Monica City Council Resolution 11026
An image of a santamonica.gov release announcing the completed runway shortening
Blue and green image of project logo with the text "Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project" on it
Historic map featuring archaeological sites belonging to the Gabrielino Indians near the end of the 1760s.
A painting showing members of the Tongva tribe and a few small structures on the grassy banks of a small stream.
A historical aerial image in black and white showing the agricultural uses that once comprised the Santa Monica Airport site.
An image of a historical newspaper clipping showing a black and white aerial image of the early Clover Field, with a small text blurb describing the site.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
A black and white photograph of two pilots standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field in the 1920s.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
An image of a promotional poster from the 1930s featuring an announcement of the Douglas Company's plan to build a a manufacturing campus at Clover Field. The poster features a rendering of the proposed facility at Clover Field, an image of over one hundred Douglas Company employees, and decorative patriotic and aviation elements.
A historical black and white photograph of a crowd of well-dressed people standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photo shows the runway having emerged on Clover Field as part of the Douglas Company's expansion of the site in the 1940s.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph showing Douglas Company facilities and hangars and several jet airplanes parked in lines on the taxiways outside.
A historical black and white photograph showcasing the decoy neighborhood that was constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An image from inside the decoy neighborhood constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph taken from an aircraft above the Clover Field runway shows the runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
A black and white photograph shows a small aircraft on the runway of Clover Field with an air traffic control tower in the background.
A black and white photograph of The Spirit of Santa Monica, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft, inside a hangar at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photograph of a built-out airport site, including the 5,000-foot runway and the extension of Clover Park onto airport land.
A photo from the 1980s showing kids playing on playground equipment at Clover Park.
An image of the text of Measure LC
An image of the text of Santa Monica City Council Resolution 11026
An image of a santamonica.gov release announcing the completed runway shortening
Blue and green image of project logo with the text "Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project" on it
Historic map featuring archaeological sites belonging to the Gabrielino Indians near the end of the 1760s.
A painting showing members of the Tongva tribe and a few small structures on the grassy banks of a small stream.
A historical aerial image in black and white showing the agricultural uses that once comprised the Santa Monica Airport site.
An image of a historical newspaper clipping showing a black and white aerial image of the early Clover Field, with a small text blurb describing the site.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
A black and white photograph of two pilots standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field in the 1920s.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A historical black and white photograph showing a man standing before approximately a dozen small propeller aircraft organized into two lines at Clover FIeld.
A black and white aerial photograph shows the emerging Clover Field site with a few small structures on-site. The context beyond Clover Field shows neighborhood streets emerging ahead of homes being built.
An image of a promotional poster from the 1930s featuring an announcement of the Douglas Company's plan to build a a manufacturing campus at Clover Field. The poster features a rendering of the proposed facility at Clover Field, an image of over one hundred Douglas Company employees, and decorative patriotic and aviation elements.
A historical black and white photograph of a crowd of well-dressed people standing in front of a propeller aircraft on-site at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photo shows the runway having emerged on Clover Field as part of the Douglas Company's expansion of the site in the 1940s.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph showing Douglas Company facilities and hangars and several jet airplanes parked in lines on the taxiways outside.
A historical black and white photograph showcasing the decoy neighborhood that was constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An image from inside the decoy neighborhood constructed over Clover Field during WWII.
An oblique black and white aerial photograph taken from an aircraft above the Clover Field runway shows the runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance.
A black and white photograph shows a small aircraft on the runway of Clover Field with an air traffic control tower in the background.
A black and white photograph of The Spirit of Santa Monica, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft, inside a hangar at Clover Field.
A black and white aerial photograph of a built-out airport site, including the 5,000-foot runway and the extension of Clover Park onto airport land.
A photo from the 1980s showing kids playing on playground equipment at Clover Park.
An image of the text of Measure LC
An image of the text of Santa Monica City Council Resolution 11026
An image of a santamonica.gov release announcing the completed runway shortening
Blue and green image of project logo with the text "Santa Monica Airport Conversion Project" on it

What's On the Site Today

  • View of runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance

    Photo 1

    View of runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance

  • View from inside the Santa Monica Airport Admin Building

    Photo 2

    View from inside the Santa Monica Airport Admin Building

  • View of Century City from the observation deck

    Photo 3

    View of Century City from the observation deck

  • View of Santa Monica Airport building

    Photo 4

    View of Santa Monica Airport building

  • View from the airport VOR with Marina del Rey in the distance

    Photo 5

    View from the airport VOR with Marina del Rey in the distance

  • The iconic and historic Ninety-Nines compass rose

    Photo 6

    The iconic and historic Ninety-Nines compass rose

  • View of runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance

    Photo 1

    View of runway with Santa Monica Bay in the distance

  • View from inside the Santa Monica Airport Admin Building

    Photo 2

    View from inside the Santa Monica Airport Admin Building

  • View of Century City from the observation deck

    Photo 3

    View of Century City from the observation deck

  • View of Santa Monica Airport building

    Photo 4

    View of Santa Monica Airport building

  • View from the airport VOR with Marina del Rey in the distance

    Photo 5

    View from the airport VOR with Marina del Rey in the distance

  • The iconic and historic Ninety-Nines compass rose

    Photo 6

    The iconic and historic Ninety-Nines compass rose

Previous SM Engagement

Previous SM Engagement

Several past public engagement efforts have laid the groundwork to re-engage the community on the future of the Airport.

Several past public engagement efforts have laid the groundwork to re-engage the community on the future of the Airport.

Community Conversations (2010-2013)

A decade before the Santa Monica Airport Conversion project and just before Measure LC was approved by voters, a community visioning process examined the airport’s non-aeronautical lands (approximately 40 acres) to imagine future uses.

A measure designed to exert local control over airport decisions, predominantly as they relate to permitted land uses, leaseholds development, and aviation activity.

Santa Monica Airport to Park Conversion Report (2018)

As part of the ongoing Park and Recreation Master Plan update, the City commissioned a study to explore potential pathways to realize the Airport to Park concept. This study became an appendix to the draft plan that was released ahead of the final Park and Recreation Master Plan update.

Community Concepts (2012-Today)

Community-led organizations, such as Airport to Park (A2P), brought together interested members of the community to champion the closure of the airport and its future transformation into a great park.

Graphic featuring a green ground plane and tree with a swooping motif of an airplane changing into a bird in light blue.